The True Benefit Of The Nexus 5 (and 6)

Discussion in 'Google Nexus' started by teamxxlp, Apr 22, 2015.

  1. teamxxlp

    teamxxlp Active Member
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    Most seasoned Nexus device owners already know this, but the Nexus 5 (and 6) feature all of the radios and bands for the major carriers in the United States. This means that a SIM card from Sprint, T-Mobile, AT&T, Verizon, and other providers will work on the Nexus 5/6 (though Verizon has blocked the Nexus 5 for no reason). It doesn't matter if your device was purchased from a carrier because Google mandates that Nexus devices are sold factory unlocked no matter who is selling the device. Few phones come with such flexibility, and you won't have to worry about moving your Nexus from a CDMA carrier to a GSM carrier and vice versa.

    Also, you won't have to tell a carrier that you're switching or jump through hoops like with other devices.
     
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  3. SecretlyTaco

    SecretlyTaco New Member

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    Here in the UK, we have a carrier called Three, and when you buy a phone from them it comes unlocked. I don't get why other carriers bother locking their phones down, if you really want to use a different carrier it's usually not too hard to unlock the device yourself.
     
  4. teamxxlp

    teamxxlp Active Member
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    Aren't all carriers in the UK GSM anyways? So locked and unlocked devices matter a lot more there. Here in the US, another issue is that CDMA and GSM phones often aren't compatible, except for iPhones, Nexus devices, and a handful of others. Unlocking your device is pretty easy under normal circumstances, though the average consumer still won't try to handle the process themselves. By law, carriers have to unlock devices for users after the contract has expired, which is nice but still a long time to wait for the carrier to do it.
     
  5. SecretlyTaco

    SecretlyTaco New Member

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    All of our carriers are GSM, in fact I think that's true for every carrier outside the US. That said, a lot of phones now have the GSM and CDMA antennas.
     
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  6. teamxxlp

    teamxxlp Active Member
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    Yeah. Sprint and Verizon in the US continue to have CDMA networks, though VoLTE should all but eliminate CDMA. It's nice to have variety, but it's such a hassle here to have two different types of network standards, incompatible devices, etc. CDMA might be comparable to GSM in most ways, but the fact that nearly everyone else is all-GSM makes CDMA more obsolete than useful.
     
  7. Kyler

    Kyler Active Member
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    Very informative. I think this does make sense though and you put it well in the post. Thank you for the information.
     
  8. SecretlyTaco

    SecretlyTaco New Member

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    Well, I don't think we're anywhere near having LTE in enough places to truly dump CDMA, and even if we did, there are still a lot of phones that don't have any kind of data support.
     
  9. teamxxlp

    teamxxlp Active Member
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    Wait, we're talking about the US and not the UK, right? I'm used to Verizon (CDMA) and AT&T (GSM) in the US, or a subsidiary under one of those companies, and the networks are so far ahead of Sprint and T-Mobile that it's not funny. I consider Verizon's network the best, though AT&T is quite close, and they both have LTE throughout much of the country. Rural areas notwithstanding for obvious reasons.

    Most of the phones that lack data support are designed as such for budget users or for those that simply want to talk and text a little bit. Those types of devices are always going to have a place for smartphone users.
     
  10. SecretlyTaco

    SecretlyTaco New Member

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    Yeah I'm talking about the US. I've heard that T-Mobile is OK in cities, and they were OK while I was in NYC, but I don't know much about how they are outside the larger cities.
     
  11. teamxxlp

    teamxxlp Active Member
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    T-Mobile and Sprint have the same problems in that their networks are pretty far behind AT&T and Verizon. They optimize their networks for the larger cities to appease as many customers as possible, but you'll notice some incredibly spotty coverage in smaller cities and in rural areas. You won't find similar issues with AT&T/Verizon to such a large degree, though.
     

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