Caliburger, the famous Los Angeles based burger chain has introduced a robot as its employee.

Until now, humans were flipping burgers at Caliburger and managing the temperature before flipping again to ensure entire burger is cooked well. However, the food chain was finding it difficult to hold on to human flippers given the nature of the job. To get rid of this problem, Caliburger came up with Flippy.

Flippy is worth $100,000 and is capable of flipping almost 2200 burgers a day. Flippy waits until humans prepare burger patties and garner it with seasoning material. As soon as humans are done with these basic tasks, Flippy brings them out. The griddles are then placed with burger patties and base. Flippy checks the temperature and flips the burgers. Once they are cooled, they are ready to be served to the customers.

“People see a robot, they hear robot, they assume job replacement,” says David Zito, the CEO of Miso Robotics, creator of Flippy and the owner of the Pasadena based Caliburger Chain.

On the question of a robot replacing the human employees, he adds, “This isn’t about replacing jobs. This is about a third hand in the kitchen.”

Here’s a video showing the Robot working at Caliburger:

If reports are to be believed, as per the popular opinions, a major part of the work in the industry will be done by the computers and robots, which they claim to be “somewhat realistic.” Not just limited to the burger stalls but in the cars and farming industry as well, robots will perform a major part of the jobs, which is quite astonishing, especially in the case of income inequality.

Flippy is not the first robot to be working in the food industry, the Zume Pizza uses a robot to make pizza and Sally makes Salad in San Francisco.

However, according to the workers of the Food industry, they are not worried about robots replacing their jobs but are now worried about their daily wages. These people are demanding food coupons as well as help from the authorities to meet the ends.

Business LA Food Chain Employs Robot at the Cost of Human Flippers